Friday, February 29, 2008

Five Sides to Every Story

I probably should tell all y'all what I've been doing instead of blogging.

I got a new job. Well, consider it more of a transfer. My task of modeling modular satellites came to an end about three weeks ago, but my supervisor Quinn Young looked around the Space Dynamics Lab and found another guy who was hiring. Dean Ferguson came to my desk and gave me the pitch, but I wasn't sure...he wanted me to work nights.

I held out for two solid days, considering my options. Then he returned and put the icing on the cake: a one-dollar raise.

The new job is part of the MKV project, paid for by the Department of Defense and contracted by Lockheed Martin. I don't know a lot about the project, but I do know that "MKV" stands for Multiple Kill Vehicle. SDL was contracted to calibrate a sensor for it. Turns out, that's one of the things they (we?) specialize in.

I've been doing odd jobs and attending meetings during the day. I won't begin my night-job proper for about another week or so, since we're still just getting the sensor all set up. I'll be working the baker's shift (4-7am), which is optimal, since I have morning classes every day and afternoons are open to napping.

I should also mention that this pentagon project is classified. What this means is I can't bring my cell phone into the room, so don't bother calling me at five in the morning. I won't answer. Also, I've already received interrim clearance, but the FBI investigation is ongoing, which means you may be contacted to vouch for me. And they could be reading this blog right now.

Just thought I'd add a little paranoia to your day.

13 comments:

Kendra said...

It sounds like a sweet job...especially for a morning person, like yourself!

So do you get to where a really cool badge with your picture on it, and then have your eye scanned to obtain access to your computer?

Thaddeus said...

No eye-scanning, but yes on the security badge. Also, there's complicated combinations and alarms and all kinds of things to dissuade spies from gaining access.

I don't think breaking into secure facilities is as simple a process as the movies make it seem.

Kendra said...

I don't know...Tom Cruise hanging by a thread with a bead of sweat ready to give him away...It really doesn't seem too easy to me. FUN!!! but not easy.

It would be fun to take a tour sometime, but it sounds like that's not an option. :)

Jenette said...

Oh wow. Four in the morning. I cannot comprehend it. But it sounds like a good opportunity and it sounds like you! Doesn't sound like you are going to be able to drop off the grid anytime soon, though. Which is too bad. It is always nice to think you have that as an option. And I really hope the FBI reads your blog. It might brighten their day!

dave said...

Multiple Kill Vehicle my eye.

Beetle said...

"Also, there's complicated combinations and alarms..." Thad, there ARE complicated combinations and alarms. Apparently they didn't hire you for your grammatical awareness.

MidSpeck said...

There WILL BE complicated combinations and alarms... oh, wait. That's not it. =)

Jinx said...

When I worked at SDL, there WERE complicated combinations and alarms, and I presume that's still the case now.

MidSpeck said...

Better cover all the bases: There IS YET BEEN complicated combinations and alarms.
Where's Alisha?

Word Diva said...

I am here, Beetle of course is right, but I thought I would let you all massacre the English language a little more. Maybe we should call y'all the MKGV--Mulitple Kill Grammar Vehicle.

MidSpeck said...

Haha. Alisha, you make me laugh.

Jinx said...

What?!? How can you say Beetle's is right and not mine? I KNOW there were complicated combinations and alarms when I worked there before, and even today I believe there STILL WERE complicated combinations and alarms. ...grammatically perfect, no?

MidSpeck said...

I think your first posting was indeed correct. I'm not sure about "STILL WERE" over "STILL ARE".